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Archive for the ‘Along the Journey’ Category

I have started writing at two new blogs.

The first is a new personal site called Candles at Dark. I felt that I needed a space that allowed a wider range of discussion in a more creative and conversational setting. We’ll see how it goes!

The second is for Columbia Theological Seminary where I work called Columbia Connections. While I will be a regular contributor, I am most excited by how this site will combine some of the best writers and stories from across the institution.

I hope you will visit both and see what God is doing.

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I have been doing some writing for Q Ideas. My most recent post is titled “Of Many Minds on Mental Illness” which you can see here: http://qideas.org/blog/of-many-minds-on-mental-illness.aspx.

In it, I argue for better policies and community support for people who are mentally ill as well as for family and friends who care for them.

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For anyone interested, this is a new blog started by my wife just last month. She is writing about our journey with our son who is diagnosed with bipolar disorder. This is the first post.

Feel free to leave comments as you go. The hope is to create a network of people supporting one another as we support loved ones with mental illness.

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“As Eve was seduced by the word of a [fallen] angel to flee from God, having rebelled against his word, so Mary by the word of an angel received the glad tidings that she would bear God by obeying his word. The former was seduced to disobey God [and so fell], but the latter was persuaded to obey God, so that the Virgin Mary might become the advocate of the virgin Eve. As the human race was subjected to death through the act of a virgin, so was it saved by a virgin, and thus the disobedience of one virgin was precisely balanced by the obedience of another.” -Irenaeus [Against Heresies]

Over the past few months, our adult class at church has been studying “Women of the Bible” exploring cultural perceptions of women both then and now. The two most significant figures in Scripture are Eve [the mother of all the living] and Mary [the mother of Jesus]. So it is especially interesting to note the connections that early Christian scholars made between the two. While I don’t believe they would draw all of the same conclusions that I do here, their perspectives and those of early Jewish scholars serve to demonstrate that many entrenched interpretations of the Bible held today are far from given. In the quote above, Irenaeus makes an amazing parallel of Eve and Mary which bears resemblance to Paul’s comparison of Adam and Jesus:

“Therefore, just as sin entered the world through one man, and death through sin, and in this way death came to all people, because all sinned—To be sure, sin was in the world before the law was given, but sin is not charged against anyone’s account where there is no law. Nevertheless, death reigned from the time of Adam to the time of Moses, even over those who did not sin by breaking a command, as did Adam, who is a pattern of the one to come. But the gift is not like the trespass. For if the many died by the trespass of the one man, how much more did God’s grace and the gift that came by the grace of the one man, Jesus Christ, overflow to the many!” [Romans 5:12-15]

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“Rejoice with those who rejoice, weep with those who weep.” Romans 12:15 (NRSV)

I always think of this verse when a holiday rolls around. And I’ve been thinking about this post for quite a long time.

The holidays are a mixed bag. We all want to have as much fun as the next person, but many of us have at least one that rings hollow for us. Whether it’s the loss of a loved one or a simple disconnect from the relevance of the day, we just don’t share the same “spirit” as “everyone else”. We may struggle with the expectations of others or just our own standard to achieve a certain level of cheer.

Rather than come across as self-righteous in contrast with someone else’s holiday joy or holiday blues… Rather than rain on someone else’s parade or pity party… I decided to wait to share my thoughts till Father’s Day which is, at best, the emptiest and sometimes saddest of holidays for me. I did not grow up knowing my father. I did not have any long-term stable father figure. But none of that is the point of this post, and yet I’m obviously preaching to myself as I write. (more…)

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I saw these insightful comments by Leonard Sweet (E. Stanley Jones professor of evangelism at Drew Theological School in NJ) today on Facebook. Given the relevance to my blog’s name, I thought I would share them here:

Jesus does not show us the way to God so that we can be more like God. God does not want us to be more like God. That is what got us into trouble in the first place: wanting to be like God. We didn’t know our place, and respect the place where God put us. Our place is a human place . . . Jesus shows us the way to ourselves, to our humanity, to our authentic human status as the highest of all God’s creation, carrying within out being the very reflection of God’s being.

One of the most misunderstood quotes in Christian history is this one from St. Athanasius of Alexandria, which has been used umpteen times to explains the doctrine of “theosis:” “The Son of God became man, that we might become God.”

Athanasius did not mean by this that it is possible for created beings to become God, or even part of God, but through the power of the Holy Spirit breathing in us we can know what it means to be fully human and inhabit our creaturely status as the created image of God.

In other words, “theosis” is not “essence” or “being” language, but relational and participatory language. The Orthodox Study Bible provides a theological clarification to the “theosis” doctrine of “deification:”

“What deification is not: When the Church calls us to pursue godliness, to be more like God, this does not mean that human beings then become divine. We do not become like God in His nature. That would not only be heresy, it would be impossible. For we are human, always have been human, and always will be human. We cannot take on the nature of God.

“Theosis” means humans get to participate in the life and love of God, not ontologically but relationally. We aren’t mimicking what Jesus did, but actually living his resurrection life with him. Human beings are creatures who share the Creator’s life. This is what it mean to “become god” for Eastern orthodoxy, or what it means to “be perfect” for holiness theology.

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Previously, I’ve discussed sleep and music as “natural sacraments”. In thinking about other areas of life that meet this criteria, it occurred to me that the Christian life as a whole is one. Obviously the life of faith should transform the individual, but here I am thinking more about the impact of Christian living on society as a whole. We are faith and food for a dying culture.

The Christian Life as a Gift

The Christian life by definition is one of sacrifice. Jesus gave himself for humanity and then calls each of us to take up our own cross. This does not mean that our sacrifice has any power for salvation on its own, but our sacrifice does share in the power of Christ and his resurrection. When we are willing to lay down our lives, our gift is matched and even multiplied for a greater return in the Kingdom of God.

The Christian Life as Knowledge

Inherent to belief in God is a connection with all knowledge. He is the Creator and Sustainer of all life. When we live with integrity, our connection to Him empowers our connection with all other aspects of Creation. This does not mean we have a special “science”, but that knowledge is better set into context to be understood as part of the whole body of knowledge. (more…)

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