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Posts Tagged ‘art’

Housekeeping note: Due to a number of amazing and good life changes I am facing this month, I am slowing down the pace of my blogging. Until further notice, I will post every Monday here and every Thursday at Perichoretic Life. I hope to share more details soon, but I need to wait till later in the month when more things are finalized. For now, enjoy this piece from my “sacrament series”.

Ever since I wrote about “Sleep as Sacrament”, I have been thinking about what other natural sacraments we have in our lives. The one that stands out to me most immediately is music. Certainly, you could insert any favorite mode of art here, but for me that would be music. So using some of the same contours of thought as I did before, I want to explore that.

As with sleep, there is an upside and a downside.

Music at its height draws us into worship of the true God. This truth is poignant for me as I recently started attending a church that does the liturgy antiphonally. (i.e. The worship leader and the congregation sing responsively.) Along with the stained glass windows, bells, and sometimes even incense, I have come to appreciate how beautiful liturgical worship can be.

Music can also become idolatrous as evidenced by the extravagance of rock concerts, the business practices of the music industry, and the naming of shows like “American Idol”. Performers become proud and puffed up rather then humbled for service. Audiences are whipped into a frenzy with no outlet for more meaningful relationship.

As with most things, this ugly side does not exist on its own. It’s merely a distortion of the good, dependent on the good. We are called to redirect our attention, not just in church music, but all music which ultimately belongs to God. This does not mean that all music must mention God explicitly, but it should in some way glorify Him. (more…)

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(For context, see “Are You My Mother?” and “The Visible Word”.)

Genesis 1:1-5
1 In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. 2 Now the earth was formless and empty, darkness was over the surface of the deep, and the Spirit of God was hovering over the waters.
3 And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light. 4 God saw that the light was good, and he separated the light from the darkness. 5 God called the light “day,” and the darkness he called “night.” And there was evening, and there was morning—the first day.

As a kid who grew up aspiring to be an astronomer with a conservative Evangelical background that emphasized creationism over evolution, I couldn’t see this passage any other way. These verses had one theological purpose to emphasize whatever scientific explanations may exist about Big Bang or other alternatives: God did it! Plain and simple. These verses were about how God created the Universe.

So I was a bit surprised a few years ago when a speaker used this and the first chapter of John as his starting point to talk about art. His goal in conversation with Evangelicals who are used to emphasizing “Word” over “Light” was that the two were not just congruent, but intimately related. Here I was seeing the artistic equivalent unfold to what I knew already from Thomas Torrance’s teachings about science. (more…)

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