Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘InterVarsity’

At no point did I think of myself as part of the classic “White Anglo Saxon Protestant” (WASP) majority, especially given that my church was located in a Jewish neighborhood and my home in a Polish Catholic one.

During my college years at Cornell, racial reconciliation was critical to growing the Evangelical community. Sometimes our discussions were met with some resistance about why we weren’t focused on the “Simple Gospel”.

So I began to learn the Biblical basis for multi-ethnicity from mentors like Neil Rendall. In his own simple terms, he taught that the Kingdom of God shows up wherever the King reigns. In other words, the true Gospel of Jesus is integral to every area of life.

My training continued while I was on staff with InterVarsity. The “Ah, Ha!” moment for me came when Joanne presented her third year project about the Latino community.

My reflection at the end was something like, “It’s amazing how many parallels there are between racial reconciliation and the Gospel.”

“Michael,” Joanne said, “in the Latino community racial reconciliation is the Gospel.” (more…)

Read Full Post »

In my third year of InterVarsity staff, the New York / New Jersey region required all new staff to finish their three-year training by developing a thesis of sorts. This study would then be the basis of a specialty for speaking to students on campus. Most picked typical themes for a general college audience such as multi-ethnicity, social justice, and gender roles. The work of my colleagues represented everything that made me proud to be part of InterVarsity.

Given my background in science, I thought it important to use my experience to further discussion of these issues. Dr. Sagan’s basic premise for critical thinking and how we learn was outlined in Demon Haunted World as being “wonder” and “skepticism”. This epistemolgy (how we know what is true) was deliberately meant to image “chance” and “necessity” as basic to his evolutionary understanding of science and the nature of the “Cosmos”.

Previously, I had read dozens of books across the spectrum of Christian understanding. It was a tortuous process in which I rejected view after view for various reasons. Finally, through this project, I would find a theologian who made sense of the science and faith chaos for me. But more on that in a moment… (more…)

Read Full Post »