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Posts Tagged ‘transformation’

Previously, I’ve discussed sleep and music as “natural sacraments”. In thinking about other areas of life that meet this criteria, it occurred to me that the Christian life as a whole is one. Obviously the life of faith should transform the individual, but here I am thinking more about the impact of Christian living on society as a whole. We are faith and food for a dying culture.

The Christian Life as a Gift

The Christian life by definition is one of sacrifice. Jesus gave himself for humanity and then calls each of us to take up our own cross. This does not mean that our sacrifice has any power for salvation on its own, but our sacrifice does share in the power of Christ and his resurrection. When we are willing to lay down our lives, our gift is matched and even multiplied for a greater return in the Kingdom of God.

The Christian Life as Knowledge

Inherent to belief in God is a connection with all knowledge. He is the Creator and Sustainer of all life. When we live with integrity, our connection to Him empowers our connection with all other aspects of Creation. This does not mean we have a special “science”, but that knowledge is better set into context to be understood as part of the whole body of knowledge. (more…)

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This article was first published on November 16, 2011 in the award-winning Comment Magazine. Check out their site!

I get it. I know what it’s like to live in the shadow of New York City. When I was growing up in New Jersey, we resented the fact that a certain football team playing at the Meadowlands was called the “New York” Giants. Even now, I work in Albany, New York (a.k.a. Smallbany). Though the area boasts many good colleges in the area, the brightest graduates often seek the better-paying jobs down in “the City.”

And don’t even get me started on how hard it is to draw talent into the non-profit world. We’re the “third sector”—as in, after public and private. How can a small nonprofit possibly compete with the benefits of a state job or the salary of a multi-national corporation?

So this week I picked up some reminders for struggling ministries, nonprofits, and businesses who are seeking to put together dynamic teams as I watched the movie Moneyball, based on journalist Michael Lewis’s book about Billy Beane, the general manager for baseball’s Oakland A’s. He finds himself defeated as he manages a small-budget team in the big world of Major League (read “New York Yankees”) Baseball. Brad Pitt brilliantly portrays the emotionally conflicted and often socially detached Billy. After losing the American League Championship to the Yankees, his team is “gutted” of all its best players. He is left to rebuild with less than one-fifth of the payroll of the large market teams. (more…)

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